Top Gear meets Lego (kinda)

I said there would be more on Lego… this is it:

I am a sometimes-fan of Top Gear (UK) and as always, when it comes to presenter James May… it’s all “kinda” :)

James May's Lego house, via Buzz Buzz Home

James May’s Lego house, via Buzz Buzz Home

Did you catch the special tv show where James May took it upon himself to commission almost 1,000 volunteers to build a 20-ft tall house made from Lego in Surrey, UK in mid-2009 for his BBC show Toy Stories? He used… get this… 3.3 million Lego pieces (hence the 1,000 volunteers!)

The Lego House,by James May, via Barnaby Gunning

The Lego House,by James May, via Barnaby Gunning

Barnaby Gunning was the inspired architect who had to work with James May’s exacting demands :)

Whilst I would not want to sleep in it, having a smaller version in my garden would be all the art and sculpture I’d need! (Now! That’s an idea.)

Lego house, James May

Lego house, James May

The translucent bricks for glass, via Barnaby Gunning

The translucent bricks for glass, via Barnaby Gunning

The Lego walls in the Lego house of James May, via Barnaby Gunning

The Lego walls in the Lego house of James May, via Barnaby Gunning

Brick detail in James May's Lego house, via Barnaby Gunning

Brick detail in James May’s Lego house, via Barnaby Gunning

James May in his Lego house

James May in his Lego house

James May near his  highly uncomfortable bed, via Daily Mail, UK

James May near his highly uncomfortable bed, via Daily Mail, UK

James May at the front door of the Lego house, via Top Gear

James May at the front door of the Lego house, via Top Gear

The sideboard in kitchen, complete with bread bin and chocolate bar, via Top Gear

The sideboard in kitchen, complete with bread bin and chocolate bar, via Top Gear

The Lego washing machine (not working), via Top Gear.

The Lego washing machine (not working), via Top Gear.

The toilet roll, via Top Gear.

The toilet roll, via Top Gear.

Lego, who donated all the Lego bricks for the project, apparently banned May from dismantling the structure upon completion. They were also apparently miffed that May did not seek their expertise and help in making this gigantic Lego-awesomeness (typical of May’s absent-mindedness) because they would have chosen a method of building that would be mobile, rather than plonking on ground.

It did have to be demolished a few weeks after because the winery May chose for the location needed the land back to grow grapes for wine. I’m sure May would have been able to purchase a plot of land for that pet project of his and hence, allow the Lego house to remain till this day!

Now… about creating a mini house in my backyard as sculpture and interest… does anyone know if rainwater is bad for Lego?

4 January 2011
13 January 2011

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2 Comments

  1. Reply

    Lea

    9 January 2011

    I imagine not unless the rain water in your area has an high acidity. I saw this when it was first broadcast. It is amazing.my dream is to (once I live in house not flat) have a craft room at the end of my garden made from lego could you imagine. It would be the ultimate craft room.x

  2. Reply

    lego city

    14 August 2012

    aaawh sweet i like the tiny lego washing machine, that looked really cute :)

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