My new yellow ambigram front door mat

I’ve been wanting to add yellows to my outdoor areas.

I am waiting for some Major Smartypants to develop yellow evergreen hydrangeas. Until then, yellows via furniture and garden accents will have to do.

First thing I did was to tackle our front doormat. I loved it when I bought it three years ago. A clear, colourful picture of bird and peony. But the colours run after use and being rained on. So now it’s a sad mash of faded colours.

My sad faded outdoor rug.

My sad faded outdoor rug.

Coir mats aren’t made to last, I don’t think! Next time you see a printed/patterned coir mat that you really like, buy a couple. I really liked mine bought new but now it’s just sad. I’m sad. There are some really pretty ones Anna Chandler ones in Australia, but at $70-100 a pop, I thought I’d try to tackle it myself with a DIY project.

When these The Come In, Go Away ambigram doormats began surfacing on blogosphere, the font-addict in me coupled with the quirky-addict in me and I began to lust after one of them.

The Come In, Go Away ambigram coir doormat

The Come In, Go Away ambigram coir doormat

But they were plain. I wanted some colour. Specifically, some yellow. I also really like the repeating tile patterns in these mats:

Yellow tile doormat, AUD$72 from Interiors Online

AUD$72, via Interiors Online

Liora Manne Yellow Arabesque Area Rug, via Macys, US$395

Liora Manne Yellow Arabesque Area Rug, via Macys, US$395

So I played around with ideas of combining the two. The first thing I did was to trace out the ambigram on Illustrator. The tan background mimics the colour of the coir:

The ambigram I created in Illustrator.

The ambigram I created in Illustrator.

I thought about spraypainting the words in yellow gloss onto the brown coir:

Testing out the yellow text against natural coir of the mat.

Testing out the yellow text against natural coir of the mat.

I didn’t really like the contrast of the yellow against the coir brown. The yellow didn’t stand out. Example:

But what if I spray painted the entire coir mat with yellow first?

Testing black text on yellow coir.

Testing black text on yellow coir.

I like!

But what if I added another tile-like motif in white?

Testing the tile-like pattern with the ambigram?

Testing the tile-like pattern with the ambigram?

I didn’t like. Too busy and complicated; the ambigram doesn’t really stand out.

I made my choice.

My supplies for my doormat project:

  • Basic coir mat; I got mine from Bunnings for five bucks!
  • Bunnings got in the spray paint brand Rust-Oleum just last week and I was told I was the proud first purchaser of these cans. I’m intrigued to see how it will go. It claims to even bond to plastic and most USA/Canada DIY bloggers have used it to great results. I got Sun Yellow and Black.
  • Large paint dropsheet; I used my lawn on a still and mildly hot day…
  • Sharp craft knife
  • Printer & A4 paper
  • Transparent masking tape
  • 3M Multipurpose Spray Adhesive; I like this because depending on how long you leave it on, it can be a temporary or permanent solution
  • Cutting mat

Directions:

1. I spraypainted the coir mat with the Sun Yellow with two coats. I waited a day before I did anything else.

My coir mat being spray painted with Rust-Oleum's Sun Yellow

2. Meanwhile, I took the measurements of the coir mat into Illustrator, overlaid it with my Come In ambigram and enlarged it until I was happy with the size. Then I printed it out onto 6 sheets of A4 card, taped it together and sliced it out SUPER-carefully with my craft knife. Took AGES!

Took an awful long time to cut out that stencil printed on 4 A4 sheets.

3. The next day, I overlaid the large sheet of paper onto the mat until I was happy with the positioning. Then I sprayed the entire BACK of the stencil with the adhesive 3M glue. Then I stuck the stencil on and made sure every little bit was stuck to the mat so you avoid as much bleed as possible.

Positioning the stencil on the coirmat with spray adhesive

4. I carefully spraypainted the gloss black onto the stencil and mat. You have to be quick with this 3M glue adhesive if you only want it to be used as a tack (rather than permanent); needs to be removed within 15 minutes. So there was only really one go. I made sure it was a repeated swish over the area a few times.

Spray paint over the stencil with black gloss.

5. Let dry!

I’m really happy with it installed!

My new yellow ambigram coir mat in situ!

My new yellow ambigram coir mat in situ!

The sorry state of bricks, trim, door and downpipes are courtesy of a landlord. We think it’s been a long time since it’s been painted. It is looking very tired.

I think that spot in the corner is a perfect spot for a large white urn filled with a green leafy EVERGREEN hydrangea. The search for a large white urn begins!

My new yellow ambigram coir mat in situ!

Total for this small DIY project: $26.70

(the other things I already had.)

5 November 2013

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2 Comments

  1. Reply

    Jeffrey

    12 November 2013

    Love it!
    Looks brilliant! Nice, bright & welcoming.

  2. Reply

    maria at inredningsvis

    12 November 2013

    WOWW SO AMAZING post:) your blog makes me happy everytime I visit.

    Check out my new post..How to make your own Gallery wall:)

    have a lovely day pretty

    OVE Maria at inredningsvis – The Swedish home decor blog

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The Woman behind the Blog

Welcome to my blog! It’s such a pleasure having you here.

What are you inspired by? I am inspired by beautiful and bright interiors, fabric, furniture, pinks, yellows, greens, chairs, china, trees, chocolate, peonies, hydrangeas, cherry blossoms, roses and rhubarb with cream.

Friends and family call me drey (pronounced 'dree'... short for Audrey) and I can often be found zipping through op-shops and vintage stores in the Blue Mountains, NSW, Australia.

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